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Non salary based rewards – build these into your offer negotiation?

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9 ways to reward staff without giving them a pay rise

With news that the majority of UK employees will not be getting a pay rise this year, according to research from recruitment specialist Robert Half UK, it’s important employers look for other ways to boost morale.

As the blame for a lack of wage raises points toward financial pressures, it can be hard to make the business case for monetary rewards. However, there is always a business case for benefits – employees feel gratitude for the hard work they do, whilst employers can enjoy productivity boosts, spurred by happy, engaged staff.

But when the purse strings are tight, it requires some creativity. Fortunately, the experts over at Veritas Gift have come up with 10 ways you can reward your staff without offering a raise…

1. A vacation day

An excellent way to thank staff is to offer one or two days holiday on top of their current holiday allowance. In fact, according to research from Joblift, there has been a 26% monthly increase in the number of people in Britain searching for jobs offering unlimited holidays. It’s clear that time matters to your staff, so make sure you value it too.

2. Give them a shiny new job title

According to the Veritas team, for many people it’s not just about the money, it’s also about the promotion, or progression. However, be sure not to dish out these promotions without firstly investing in…

3. Training

Offering employees training courses can be a great alternative to a pay rise – upskilling your workforce is crucial, especially as digital transformation gets underway. In turn, your employee gets a number of new skills they might not have achieved without you.

4. Take them out

Sometimes a good old-fashioned knees up is a great way to show your thanks. Whether you take the company out for a slap up meal or put some money behind the bar in the local pub, it will show employees you care.

5. Award them

Another alternative is to set up a company awards night. You could have an ’employee of the year’ award, or maybe a best in each region or department if your firm is big enough.

6. Write a letter of thanks

A personalised letter is also a great way show staff you appreciate their work. PepsiCo CEO Indra Nooyi has taken employee gratitude more than a few steps further, writing over 400 letters a year to the parents of her high-performing senior executives. She explains that she wants her employees to know her as a person, not just as a CEO. With a Glassdoor rating of 75%, the tactic seems to be working. Read more about that here.

7. Upgrade the desk space

Offering your employee a better desk space is something that can easily be done. According to research from IDC and Cornerstone, the main barriers to digital transforming your organisation, included legacy IT systems (34%). So why not invest in better technology? Not only will it make your employee’s workday’s easier, it could bring a productivity boost too.

8. Ask staff how they would like to be recognised

If you’re unsure on what your staff really want, you could always ask what they would like instead of a raise, as it may be that they would like more flexi time, a gym membership, or a longer lunch break.

9. Provide mentoring

Arranging some one on one training sessions between staff and someone in the organisation they can learn from, is a great way to help their careers. As Fiona McDonnell, the Director of Beer, Wines and Spirits for Amazon EU previously told us, at Amazon, there are a range of community groups where like-minded employees can connect and support each other.

McDonnell explains: “Networking is not something everyone likes, but it is also easier to connect with someone while doing something you like. People work with people and I think it is important to learn to connect with others,” she says. “Internal networks are valuable, as getting things done in any large organisation, is easier when you know how to reach out to people.”

Full article found on HR Grapevine


New selection trends – escape rooms and “speed dating”

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Is ‘professional speed dating’ recruitment’s next big trend?

For many of your clients, recruitment is probably a fairly simple process. You send them a CV, they decide who they want to interview, and they take their pick out of those they meet face to face.

However, some candidates are getting a little bored with traditional methods. Research from The Knowledge Academy has found that the majority (82%) of job hunters would be interested in somewhat unorthodox ways of demonstrating their skill sets.

Professional Speed Dating Sessions

What is it? Some companies have taken their recruitment process offline by facilitating professional speed dating sessions. Candidates talk to different senior and junior employees for a defined amount of time about what they can bring to a role in terms of experience, qualifications and skills.

Thereafter, key decision makers decide amongst themselves who to bring back for the next round, or even make a job offer then and there. 70% of UK job seekers said this could be of interest to them.

What is it good for? 62% of UK companies like this method, and that could be because it’s great at seeing which candidates do well under pressure. It’s a quick way to get a good all-round picture of a candidate without the formality of a one-on-one interview.

Escape rooms

What is it? More than three quarters (76%) of UK job seekers said they would like to be tested by being challenged to complete an ‘escape room’. These puzzles involve a small team being shut into a room and having to complete various tasks in order to complete an objective.

For example, ClueQuest in London features a mission where you must save the building from a (fictional!) explosion, while Code to Exit in Altrincham asks players to fix a time machine.

What it’s good for? Potential employers get the chance to see potential hires using their lateral thinking skills and their natural problem-solving abilities – things which might be difficult to judge in a traditional sit-down interview. As a result, 68% of UK companies would be interested in using these fun puzzles to assess applicants.


Capture the flag

What is it? In this exciting outdoor game, a team of candidates need to steal a flag from the opposing team’s base and return it to their own – before the opposing team does it first. However, if they get caught by an enemy player, then they may have to stay frozen in place, or they could switch teams, depending on the rules. Over half (54%) of Brits said they would be interested in being assessed through this game.

What’s it good for? To be successful, a team needs to work together and communicate well. Hiring managers will see if people are natural leaders, or good at sticking to tasks they have been assigned. That is why 30% of UK companies would be interested in using this game in their recruitment processes.

Full article on Recruitment Grapevine


Graduate recruiters still rely on ‘milkrounds’ despite digitisation

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‘Human touch’ is valued and face-to-face visits may even have become more popular.

Face-to-face ‘milkrounds’ remain a crucial part of graduate hiring, despite increased use of technology and social media in the recruitment process, research released yesterday concluded.

Recruiter Alexander Mann Solutions’ study of more than 2,000 global HR professionals identified a growing trend of employers using online channels to target the best candidates for their job.

However, while many organisations make use of digital platforms like Facebook, WhatsApp, LinkedIn and Twitter, the majority were still not confident in their mastery of online tools and additionally relied on face-to-face interaction during their recruitment process.

“The online revolution has enabled employers to reach out to a much wider audience than ever before and to build sustained levels of engagement with candidates, which could only have been dreamed of in the past,” said Sandrine Miller, head of emerging talent consulting at Alexander Mann Solutions. “However, our research has found that the human touch – actually getting in front of individuals face-to-face rather than through a screen – remains vital.”

Stephen Isherwood, chief executive of the Institute of Student Employers, told People Management: “Evidence shows that despite the adoption of new technology by recruiters, face-to-face contact continues to be popular, demonstrating just how effective it is at engaging talent and keeping them interested.

Full article on peoplemanagement.co.uk


10 things you should never say when leaving your job

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Leaving an organisation you’ve devoted a number of years to can spark an extremely awkward conversation. Especially, if you’ve been working for a small or family-owned firm, where you might feel like you’re letting not just the team, but the whole business, down.

But, in throughout our professional lives, being selfish and making decisions for ourselves is important.

Whatever our reasons for leaving, handing in your notice can be a tough conversation. Should you be brutally honest, or keep things polite? How can your manager know where they’re falling short if they don’t know the truth?

Whilst it might feel good to lay into the business to get everything off your chest, in the long run, it’s not worth it. Pointing out areas where they could improve might be useful, but there are some things that should be left unsaid.

Now we agree with most of these suggestions in the article, though maybe not as strongly worded as “dont”, but the general idea is correct. Use your own judgement as to how much info/opinion you pass on. Oh and we would still do an exit interview, so do disagree with that one!

1. Don’t bash your employer

Even if your manager asks why you’re leaving, just tell them that you need a change. Ryan advises to say: “Thank you for everything you’ve done,” adding that it won’t do any good to air your complaints.

2. Don’t apologise

“You are not sorry,” Ryan writes. “You owe your employer a good day’s work every day you work, and that’s all you owe them. You don’t have to apologise for changing jobs.”

3. Don’t give away too much 

You don’t have to tell your employer where you’re going to next, unless you want to.

4. Don’t make any promises

If you feel the pressure to keep the conversation positive, or offer your help after you’ve gone, don’t. “You don’t want to answer their calls three months from now when you have a whole new job to focus on,” Ryan says.

5. Don’t sign anything 

If your employer tries to get you to sign a document, always have it reviewed by a professional before you can sign it. “It’s probably a non-compete agreement, a release from all claims or a non-solicitation agreement that will bar you legally from contacting your current employee’s customers and maybe employees, too,” Ryan says. “It’s too bad for them that they waited until now to try to get you to sign something. They have no power over you now, and you don’t have to sign a thing.”

6. Don’t tell them who knew

If someone in HR asks you, ‘Which of your workmates knew that you were job-hunting?’ don’t tell them anything. You can just say it was a personal effort.

7. Don’t say that you’ll do an exit interview

“I’m not a fan of exit interviews,” says Ryan. “If they wanted to know how you felt about your job, why did they wait until you quit to ask you?”

8. Don’t tell them how long you’ve been looking

If your manager asks how long you’ve been on the market, you can say, ‘Oh, I only looked at occasional opportunities that came along and this one was perfect for me,’ Ryan advises. It will only rub salt on a wound if you’ve been looking for a while.

9. Don’t say you’ll get them a new job

Your workmates might ask you to help them get a foot in the door at your new company once they hear you’re moving on. Don’t promise anything – you haven’t started your new job yet.

10. Don’t agree to a counter offer

If your employer wants to put together a counter offer, just tell them: “I’ve already accepted the job offer and signed an offer letter.” A quick reaction to you leaving isn’t going to resolve the issues that got you to start job-hunting in the first place.

Full article on Executive Grapevine


How employers can address STEM graduate unemployment

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Employers are crying out for graduates with vital science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) skills.

However, the reality is, despite an increased focus on STEM education, many STEM graduates are still unemployed six months after graduating, according to a recent CIPD report.

But, how can employers ensure talented STEM graduates, who are essential to the labour market, are developing the essential employability skills?

Speaking to HR Grapevine, Dr David Docherty, CEO of the National Centre for Universities and Business (NCUB), and Chairman of Placer, explains: “It is vital that we urgently improve work experience opportunities for all graduates, particularly those in STEM, to support young people as they move from education into the workplace. Students need to be gaining work-ready skills concurrently with academic study, enabling them to apply the knowledge gained in education, to the workplace. One critical part of the solution is improved access to quality work experience for undergraduates so that talented STEM students can enter the labour market more quickly.

“Not only is this issue important for students and universities but for employers too. Offering quality work experience opportunities means STEM companies can create lasting relationships to help fill the next generation of entry-level jobs. It is a cost-effective way to build a talent pool of young people who businesses can ensure develop the skills and experience required to thrive in STEM industries.

“On graduation, students who undertake work experience will have both knowledge of company culture, and the confidence in their skills, to ensure they are prepared to join organisations workplace-ready with fresh, innovative ideas.”

In addition, research from Centrica found that more than a third (33%) of students surveyed feel under-informed about STEM careers, and when asked, nearly half of all students surveyed could not name one female role model in STEM – meaning that this issue needs to be tackled by both schools and organisations.

Paul Gilliam, HR Director – UK & Ireland at L’Oréal, explains how they have proactively encouraged those looking to enter into science professions. “We believe fostering female scientists of the future starts much earlier in life, which is why, to mark the tenth anniversary of For Women in Science, we have linked with the Inspiring the Future programme, run by UK charity Education & Employers, to inspire the next generation of scientists by encouraging both boys and girls to take an interest in science at primary school age,” he says.

“Companies have a responsibility to give back to the community and we truly believe that by encouraging more scientists into schools and opening children’s eyes to the range of careers that science leads to, we can help make scientific jobs feel both exciting and attainable and ultimately achieve a better gender balance in science.”

Full article on HR Grapevine


Why is graduate recruitment down 5 per cent?

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Brexit, apprenticeship levy and over-supply of graduates all blamed for first fall in five years.

The number of graduates being recruited by major employers fell 5 per cent in 2017, the first annual drop in five years, according to a new survey.

The Graduate Market in 2018 – a study by High Fliers Research of graduate vacancies, starting salaries and undergraduate work experience programmes at the UK’s 100 leading graduate employers – found significantly fewer graduates than expected were recruited in 2017.

Private sector graduate recruitment was down 10 per cent despite overall employment levels remaining buoyant. Earlier this month, REC statistics suggested permanent employment was picking up pace, with demand for staff described as ‘strong’.

Overall graduate recruitment by leading employers – including Goldman Sachs, Unilever and BP –  had been forecast to rise by up to 10 per cent in 2017, but the report said uncertainty about the impact of Brexit was a key factor in a cut of 4.9 per cent year-on-year.

The largest drop was seen in accounting and professional services firms, banking and finance and City investment banks in particular. However, employers are more optimistic about the year ahead, with graduate recruitment expected to recover by 3.6 per cent in 2018.

Martin Birchall, managing director of High Fliers Research, said: “It’s clear that the uncertainty caused by Brexit has already hit the graduate job market. Although employers in a number of key industries and business sectors are hoping to increase their graduate recruitment again in 2018, the outlook of many recruiters remains cautious for the year ahead.”

Laura-Jane Rawlings, CEO at Youth Employment UK, said the labour market was currently “really tough” for young people, but she said Brexit was not the only factor.

Rawlings said uncertainty around Brexit, combined with the introduction of the apprenticeship levy, meant many big businesses were holding fire on recruitment while they considered what their youth employment strategy would look like going forward.

“In two to three years, the apprenticeship levy will be a phenomenally good piece of policy but what it has done short term is to make employers stop and take their foot off the pedal,” Rawlings said. “Short term – this year, last year and next year – it will slow down youth recruitment. Eventually, the upside will be that once employers have upskilled their current workforce, they will look at what they need to do to bring in more young people,” Rawlings said.

She added that the apprenticeship levy meant big businesses are more incentivised to employ young people, which could result in a reduction in graduate recruitment as companies recognise that graduates don’t always have the exact skills their business needs, so they still need to invest in training.

Geraint Johnes, research director at the Work Foundation and Professor of economics at Lancaster University Management School, said that although the High Fliers data had only analysed 100 businesses, the results broadly aligned with the labour market as a whole.

“A lot of employers, especially in big businesses and sectors that have traditionally employed a lot of graduates, have been cautious and delayed recruitment while the scenario [around Brexit] remains uncertain,” he said.

Agreeing with Rawlings, Johnes said he felt the introduction of the levy had also caused some businesses to pause on recruitment. “The levy is something industry is still coming to terms with. It is a matter of businesses sorting out what they want to do and then Brexit is overlying that and causing great uncertainty,” he added.

The survey findings were published amid growing concern about the value of a degree and a potential over-supply of graduates. The House of Lords Select Committee is conducting an inquiry into the economics of higher, further and technical education, while a November 2017 study from the CIPD suggested that barely half of graduates were in graduate-level jobs six months after leaving education.

Full article on People Managment


CIPD – Barely half of graduates are in graduate-level jobs

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CIPD survey suggests official figures may be over-estimated; female graduates earn £2,500 less on average

Universities have come under pressure to justify their tuition fees after new CIPD research revealed that a little over half of graduates are in graduate-level jobs six months after leaving education.

Graduates are also earning well below the UK average wage, while female graduates are paid less than men, according to The graduate employment gap: expectations versus reality.

Just 52 per cent of university graduates had found graduate-level jobs six months after graduation, while almost a third were earning less than £20,000, compared to the UK average wage of £28,300. While the average salary for male graduates is £24,000, women are paid just £21,500.

STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) graduates were found to be more likely to be unemployed after six months than the average graduate, despite successive government strategies designed to prioritise such degrees.

Lizzie Crowley, skills adviser at the CIPD, said the report showed the government’s “preoccupation” with boosting graduate numbers had led to high levels of over-qualification and “potential skills mismatches” that undermined productivity growth. She called on the government to consider linking tuition fees to graduate destination data, to prevent higher education institutions charging top-rate fees while delivering disappointing outcomes.

Coming just a week ahead of the autumn budget, the report accused the government of ‘inflating’ official figures and claiming that 77 per cent of graduates are in graduate-level jobs six months after graduating, by including jobs that do not necessarily require a degree such as fitness instructors, youth and community workers, choreographers and dancers. It recommended that universities should be prevented from charging students the maximum level of tuition fee unless better outcomes are delivered.

It is not the first time graduate salaries have been the subject of controversy. Last year, People Management reported that one third of graduates earn less per hour than qualified apprentices. Data obtained by MP Frank Field, chairman of the House of Commons’ work and pensions select committee, showed that 29 per cent of graduates earned less per hour than fully fledged apprentices, while pay rates for 10 per cent of graduates had actually decreased.

The figures on gender were particularly troubling, said Crowley, who dismissed previous claims that differential pay between male and female graduates was related to chosen subjects of study.

“This data proves that the gender pay gap is baked in from the point of graduation,” she said. “Regardless of when women study, or indeed where they study, they are paid less than their male peers. If we are going to eliminate the gender pay gap, employers need to ensure they are paying fairly right across their organisations from day one, including among recent graduates.”

A YouGov survey in July revealed that one in 10 employers were paying women less than men, and suggested the gender pay gap spanned all levels of employment. Female apprentices were £2,000 a year worse off than their male counterparts.

Duncan Brown, head of HR consultancy at the Institute for Employment Studies, said: “Common assumptions that the gender pay gap is no more for the under 30s are rightly brought into question by the CIPD report. What is particularly worrying are the gaps we are seeing for newly recruited graduates in the same discipline. HR needs to ensure that any pay discretion line managers have on recruitment salaries is properly monitored and controlled.”

But Stephen Isherwood, chief executive of the Institute of Student Employers, said it was not seeing any pay gaps for female graduates on corporate graduate programmes. Instead, female graduates are “more likely” to get through the selection process. However, there is a “fundamental issue” with careers advice and guidance in schools, he said, and he called for more support for pupils to help them understand which education route is best suited to their career aspirations.

Sophie Phillipson, founder of HelloGrads – which prepares students and recent graduates for life after university – told People Management that the issue of unemployed STEM graduates pointed to a much bigger problem: UK businesses are “lagging behind” in adopting new technologies and entry-level salaries do not reflect living, she said.

Full CIPD article


Quarter of retirees head back to work, study reveals

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But former pensions minister warns of ‘unhappy older workforce’ who can’t afford to quit

Around a quarter of retirees return to work, with most of those heading back to the daily grind within five years of retiring, according to a new study.

The research by the University of Manchester and King’s College London also found that men were 26 per cent more likely than women to return to paid work following retirement, while people whose partner still worked were 31 per cent more likely to return following retirement than those whose partner did not work.

Additionally, those with post-secondary qualifications were almost twice as likely to return to work than those with no qualifications.

“The fact that older people with more human capital are more likely to ‘unretire’ suggests that it may be difficult for those in poorer financial circumstances to find paid work,” said Professor Karen Glaser, professor of gerontology at King’s College London and a senior investigator on the study. “This may lead to future disparities in later life income.”

Professor Debora Price, director of the Manchester Institute for Collaborative Research on Ageing and a co-author of the research, added: “This research points to the changing nature of retirement transitions, and the more fluid relationships that people have with paid work around mid and into later life. There are messages here for employers that might want to think about these new demographics, but also for policymakers as it looks like the possibilities to supplement savings or retirement income in later life through ‘unretirement’ are available to a greater extent to the already advantaged.”

And Dr Jill Miller, diversity and inclusion adviser at the CIPD, said: “With our ageing population, and the experience and skills older workers offer, employers need to consider how they can attract and retain the significant talent pool of older workers. Often, simple adjustments to working time or the job role can enable people to continue to contribute to the success of the organisation.”

However, other commentators noted that the research may have uncovered an issue with people financially having no other option than to work in their golden years. Steve Webb, former pensions minister and now director of policy at Royal London, told People Management that although many of those who head back to work after retirement do so because they “miss the stimulation and social contact”, there is a “real danger” that a whole generation of people will simply be unable to retire in the first place because they have failed to save enough into their pension pot.

“If employers do not address this issue they could find themselves with an unhappy older workforce that does not want to work but cannot afford to stop,” Webb said.

Kate Smith, head of pensions at Aegon, added that it is in “employers’ best interests to encourage pension saving and retirement planning”, as what people have saved in their pensions will ultimately dictate when they can retire.

However, the University of Manchester and King’s College London study found that people who reported having financial problems before retiring or were on a low income were not more likely to return to work than those who had no such issues, although those who were still paying off their mortgage were more likely to return to work.

Article on CIPD


Top 25 Graduate employers

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Britain’s most prestigious graduate employers have been revealed, in The Times Top 100 Graduate Employers list.

PwC took the top spot, for the 14th consecutive year. This year, the consultancy giant recruited 1,500 graduates and school leavers, and gave 960 students paid work experience and internships. The Civil Service Fast Stream scheme was second, followed by Aldi. Teach First and Google rounded out the top five.

John Manzoni, Civil Service Chief Executive, said he was “delighted” at the result, and stressed that there has “perhaps never been a more exciting time to consider a leadership career in the civil service.” And he’s right, the report found that Government departments and other public-sector employers will take on the largest proportion of graduates next summer – a total of 4,200.

Despite the great news for the public-sector, graduates will now be under more pressure to land themselves a lucrative scheme. The Times report found that two in five of the biggest companies are cutting the number they recruit due to concerns over Brexit, economic uncertainty and pressure to take on more school-leavers. Only 19,435 places will be on offer from the top 100 graduate employers, down 2.2% on this year.

The City is feeling the pinch the most, with investment banks and fund managers reducing intake by almost a fifth. In addition, retail is offering almost a quarter fewer graduate jobs next summer, with John Lewis suspending its programme altogether whilst it reviews its future.

Despite economic uncertainty, graduate entry salaries are unchanged for third year at £30,000 on average. Newton, the consulting firm, offers up to £50,000, while Aldi pays £44,000 and Lidl £40,000.

Britain’s most prestigious graduate employers have been revealed, in The Times Top 100 Graduate Employers list.

PwC took the top spot, for the 14th consecutive year. This year, the consultancy giant recruited 1,500 graduates and school leavers, and gave 960 students paid work experience and internships. The Civil Service Fast Stream scheme was second, followed by Aldi. Teach First and Google rounded out the top five.

John Manzoni, Civil Service Chief Executive, said he was “delighted” at the result, and stressed that there has “perhaps never been a more exciting time to consider a leadership career in the civil service.” And he’s right, the report found that Government departments and other public-sector employers will take on the largest proportion of graduates next summer – a total of 4,200.

Despite the great news for the public-sector, graduates will now be under more pressure to land themselves a lucrative scheme. The Times report found that two in five of the biggest companies are cutting the number they recruit due to concerns over Brexit, economic uncertainty and pressure to take on more school-leavers. Only 19,435 places will be on offer from the top 100 graduate employers, down 2.2% on this year.

The City is feeling the pinch the most, with investment banks and fund managers reducing intake by almost a fifth. In addition, retail is offering almost a quarter fewer graduate jobs next summer, with John Lewis suspending its programme altogether whilst it reviews its future.

Despite economic uncertainty, graduate entry salaries are unchanged for third year at £30,000 on average. Newton, the consulting firm, offers up to £50,000, while Aldi pays £44,000 and Lidl £40,000.

1 PwC

2 Civil Service

3 Aldi

4 Teach First

5 Google

6 Deloitte

7 NHS

8 KPMG

9 EY

10 GSK

11 BBC

12 Unilever

13 Lidl

14 JP Morgan

15 Rolls-Royce

16 Accenture

17 HSBC

18 Goldman Sachs

19 Barclays

20 Jaguar Land Rover

21 McKinsey & Company

22 John Lewis Partnership

23 BP

24 L’Oréal

25 IBM

Article on HRGrapevine


Are UK employers attitudes to career gaps outdated?

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British workers are more reluctant to take a career break compared to other nations, due to fears that they will reduce their employability. However, by refusing to take sabbaticals or extended leave, they could be increasing their risk of burnout.

According to research commissioned by Opodo.co.uk, UK employees, among other European nationals surveyed, are most likely to be allowed extended leave by their current employer, with one in five (20%) saying their workplace allows them to take this break.

However, more than half (54%) of those questioned believe it would be hard to return to work after a sabbatical. One in five (21%) feel it could make them less employable, while a further one in ten (13%) believe it will harm their career prospects.

On the contrary, almost two-thirds of people (61%) in Spain believe extended leave will help them in the future, in terms of employability, and more than half (60%) of those in Germany agreed.

Despite this, Brits are well aware of the benefits to their wellbeing that leave could bring. The research finding that a main motivator for extended leave is to get away from work-related stress. Over two-thirds (69%) of Brits believe that they currently don’t have a good work-life balance.

Three-quarters added (75%) that they don’t have a generous holiday allowance. However, UK employers were rated among the most generous of the nations polled when it comes to leave.

The research also found the difference between the benefits offered by UK employers, in comparison to other nations polled including France, Germany, Sweden, the US, Italy, Portugal and Spain.

The difference between benefits offered by UK employers, in comparison to other nations (France, Germany, Sweden, the US, Italy, Portugal and Spain).

Benefit UK Worldwide
A generous holiday allowance 25%   22%
Flexibility around working from home i.e. for house maintenance visits 19%   17%
Time off in lieu for days worked over the weekend 16%   16%
Flexibility to leave early to catch a flight/go on holiday 15%   22%
Flexible working hours for parents to juggle childcare 15%   16%
Leave early on Friday 14%   19%
An unpaid sabbatical 13%   10%
A paid sabbatical 7%   9%
Summer Hours’ schedule i.e. 8-3pm shift 4%   11%
None of the above 38%   32%